Friday, 30 March 2012

Too Much Can't Be Good

I've been told that being heavy-handed with the soy sauce when eating sushi can offend the chef. It overrides the subtle flavour of the sushi.

I also hate it when a friend who wants to share my saucer of soy sauce, mix the wasabi vigorously in the sauce. No no no. I take my wasabi on the side and adjust the amount with whatever I'm eating. Some sushi gets a little bit more than the other.

There is one sauce that I've seen being splashed around on plates liberally here, and that's chilli sauce. Chilli sauce or ketchup in my opinion can totally drown the natural flavour of a dish. I like ketchup myself but I put it sparingly or if I am consciously trying to flavour a particularly tasteless food. (KFC very dry chicken comes to mind).

Boggles the mind on how some of my friend would even need chilli sauce for a spaghetti marinara. Why? Why? Why? Or is it normal to do that and I just didn't know? @.@

p.s I should totally chill, shouldn't I?

36 comments:

  1. good morning Lina! Have a good day ahead!

    ReplyDelete
  2. soy sauce too much is no good yo, I got reminded so many times by my relative and my mum. Because my uncle use to have some sickness which is require wash his kidney everyday to keep the kidney running healthy :/

    I think I should decide cut down on everything since your blog post remind me to do it well lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We should take/do all things in moderation.

      I need to remind myself of this too. ^^

      Delete
  3. Food/language question!

    Do you guys have a chutney that has a name that kinda sorta sounds like blatjang? We do, in SA, and I think blatjang has a Malaysian sound to it. Given our mutual food history, I can't help wondering.

    The most popular condiment in SA is probably Mrs Balls Chutney. Yup, that's her name. Mrs Balls. :D Her peach chutney is what we call "blatjang" in Afrikaans.

    I suspect some people cover their sushi in soy sauce and wasabi in an attempt to hide the raw fish taste. They're determined to eat sushi because it's fashionable, but they don't like the taste, so ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read that blatjang's origin came from Javanese belacan (or sambal belacan?).

      Belacan (or blachang)is basically dried shrimp which is then pounded with others stuff to make a prefectly spicy condiments to meals.

      Our version would have it as :
      1. Sambal tempoyak (tempoyak is fermented durian)
      2. Mangoes(my favourite would be of the "bachang" and "kuinin" variety
      3. or simply sambal with tomatoes pounded together.

      So, is that where it comes from - the blatjang?

      Anyone out there who have better knowledge about it? ^^

      Delete
    2. I've eaten mango chutney too! Bachang blatjang? :D

      We have lots of condiments in SA - it's that old spice trade again! - but they're all vegetable-based or fruit-based. As far as I know, no seafood or meat ingredients.

      Delete
    3. Actually, the chutney might be more Indian influenced than Malay influenced - maybe due to the spice trade route? xD

      But it is rather interesting to read the mention of blatjang and comparing it with belacan. Well, when one travels and miss one's food, one need to adapt with whatever ingredients one can come up with. No? yes?

      Delete
  4. I love soy sauce and you can say I dip most of my food in soy sauce. Not so much of a chilli and ketchup person.

    Anyway, moderation is the key word here! Lol! You have a wonderful weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have a great weekend too! ^^

      Delete
  5. Chilli you said? Being typical Malaysian, every food must come with chilli. Pedas baru sedap, kekeke!

    Western food - chilli sauce and ketchup.
    Local food - chilli padi or sambal.

    Agree?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL

      I guess that's why Zaini and I get weird looks when we always decline chilli sauce or ketchup when they are offered. So not typical!

      And your comment reminded me of our trip to HK yonks ago. The group consisted of mostly Chinese and we were the only Malay yet the others were asking for cili padi for meals accompaniment. Of course, cannot get cili padi so big chillies sliced were served to us instead. One guy said "tak pedas, tak sedap owh" LOL

      Delete
  6. I don't dip my sushi with too much of soy sauce. Too salty will 'cover' the taste of the sushi.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True! What's point of masking the original taste?

      Delete
  7. I also won't kacau my wasabi into the soy sauce.... as I learnt that wasabi is not meant to be stir with soy sauce, right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But a lot of us, do so and kacau the wasabi into the soy sauce vigorously.

      I think I read it somewhere that purists absolutely frown on the "wasabi soup" mixture which is mixing wasabi in the soy sauce.

      Delete
  8. Take everything in moderation, even when such thing is said to promote our health.

    Like we know Vit C is good, but we cannot overdose our body too.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I think it's more a habit thingy. I've seen diners pouring soy sauce all over their plate even before trying the food! Oh well..to each his own.

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    Replies
    1. We think nothing of pouring soy sauce on our rice here, but it is a definite no no in Japan.

      Don't pour soy sauce on rice when eating Japanese food!

      yeah, I guess habit is a big part of what we do. Which is a pity, sometimes.

      Delete
  10. i also don't like mixing wasabi into soy sauce, it's not supposed to be the right way of eating sushi.. this is so malaysian only!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right?

      Who on earth started this???!!

      Delete
  11. in fact i don't like wasabi at all, even having sushi i don't dip them into soy sauce also.. i trust the chef already did the best seasoning on the sushi, or perhaps no seasoning but to eat the sushi at its most basic for the best taste..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is very true.

      I dip it in though. A little bit. Not much. ;p

      Delete
  12. yalah, i don't understand why most people here likes chili sauce so much.. it seems to be more of a habit than to enhance the flavor of the food.. indeed, they can't eat without chili sauce.. WHY WHY WHY WHY WHY WHY WHY???????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder too. Why? Why? Why?

      I eat everything just fine without chilli sauce. Not even for McD Burgers.

      But for KFC chicken, I had to. They are so darn tasteless and dry for me.

      Delete
  13. easily seen especially in fast food chain.. look at the crazy consumption of chili sauce, you'll faint!! sometimes they even need chili sauce for rice and steak.. @_@

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True.

      That's why now cannot put chilli sauce/ketchup bottles on tables already. People dump the sauce onto their plate like their food depends on it to be edible.

      Delete
  14. gadis, since you've been to japan so many times.. maybe you should share with us japanese "etiquette" of eating.. hey, i thot today is tales of two cities?? haha, this can be the topic for next week then..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Two cities la ni. No kah?

      Got mention Japan.

      Got comparison to us Malaysian too. ;p

      I know squat about Japanese eating etiquette lah. xD

      Delete
  15. I don't believe in sauce's on anything. I eat 'em plain!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very good! :)

      I believe that's how we should enjoy good food.

      Delete
  16. I'm with you. Other than french fries, i shake my head when I see people shower their pizza with chilli sauce!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too!

      Pizza has so much flavour already. I don't even have it with my fries. But then, I need a lot of salt for it. Not good also. ;p

      Delete
  17. I prefer to eat sushi just plain without sauce

    ReplyDelete

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